Cooking Guide

How to Cultivate a Balanced, Meat-Inclusive Diet


New year, new foods, right? With that in mind, you're looking at a great opportunity to spice up your typical meat dishes. Whether it's trying new types of Alaskan salmon or finally mustering up the courage to buy steaks and meat online, it's time to try something new!


If veggies have been on your mind, then keep reading. In keeping with the theme of New Year's resolutions, here are a few tips to help you cultivate a fresh, well-balanced, and meat-inclusive diet.


Don't Neglect Portion Size


According to the American Heart Association, one portion size of meat is approximately three ounces. If you're ever unsure of what your portioning out for yourself, check the weight of the protein. Fortunately, we're not talking about stepping on a scale, but there has never been a better time to invest in a good kitchen scale! The more accurate you can be when measuring out meal and meat portions, the better. Some guides may liken portion size to your fist or a deck of cards, but the only truly accurate measure is weight on a reliable scale.


Marinate!


A study by researchers at Kansas State University revealed that marinating meat before grilling can help decrease heterocyclic amines (HCAs), compounds that scientists theorize may increase your risk for certain types of cancer, by an estimated 70 percent more. Researchers found that this was especially true of meats marinated with rosemary for over one hour. Considering that, on average, Americans eat almost 90 pounds of chicken annually, marinating is a great way to spice up a classic culinary staple. Not only that, but using herbs and marinating your meat is bound to make it even more tender and delicious when it does come time to chow down.


Try Adding Veggies... With a Twist


While there's nothing quite like pairing marinated steak with some pasta, it's time to experiment with veggies. Have you ever considered pairing your grass fed beef and different types of Alaskan salmon with spiralized veggies? Zucchini and summer squash are both popular options for veggie noodles. Boil them or serve them fresh, these pasta alternatives will have you looking at free range meats in a whole new light.


Whether you're ready to try something new or you're just looking for ways to improve your meat cooking skills, these tips are sure to help you create a well-balanced diet that includes all of your favorite cuts.